Search Results for: intern

Law And Security

Category : Jobs In

In absence of law and security, it will be very hard for order to exist in the society.  Thankfully, the existence of law as well as legal, law enforcement and security professionals help to check destructive anti-social behaviors to a significant extent. These professionals play vital roles in the society and this explains why many of them are well remunerated for their services. If you are considering a career in law or security, you should be able to find information that you can factor into your decision-making in this piece.

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How to Become a Model

Category : Careers

Many people, especially teenagers, are interested in knowing how to become a model. The glamor, fame and opulent lifestyle enjoyed by figures such as Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss are the top reasons people are usually interested in modeling. The good thing is that almost anybody can become a model since there are different kinds. If you are considering modeling, here are tips you can use on how to become a teen model.

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Biotechnology

Category : Jobs In

Biotechnology refers to the use of biological or living organisms and systems to fabricate new products, which are mostly biopharmaceutical drugs. It is often seen as overlapping with bioengineering, biomedical engineering and related fields. The biotechnology industry has witnessed significant growth in the last few years and that trend looks set to continue for years to come. This post provides useful information about the biotech industry and some job titles you may be eligible for as a first-timer.

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Heathrow Airport Jobs

Category : Job Search

The London Heathrow Airport is a leading airport not only in the United Kingdom, but also in Europe and the world. It is a great place that anyone can dream to work based on remuneration and other benefits, including international exposure. In this post, you will learn all you need to know about this aviation facility and available Heathrow Airport jobs.

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Earn Money Making Websites

Category : Entrepreneurship

Want to do what I do? Want to make money while you sleep, eat, go to school, spend time with friends, and go on vacation? Well, I’ve learned that it is really straightforward, but it takes a lot of time, learning, and dedication. Let me show you how to get started making websites that make you money.

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Data Entry Jobs

Category : Careers

Data entry jobs are probably one of the easiest jobs to do, especially in terms of experience and skill requirements. A significant rise in this type of jobs has been witnessed over the last two decades or so with soaring use of the Internet. More and more companies now outsource their data entry needs to cut costs, while an increasing number of people continue to develop interest in working from home. This piece should provide you with all the information you need on data entry jobs, if you have interest in doing them.

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Part Time Jobs For Students

Category : Job Search , Jobs For

Part-time jobs for students, both those in high schools and colleges, offer a good means of getting extra money to take care of bills while in school. Such jobs also help to enhance the chances of high school students gaining admission into their preferred colleges and universities. Are you interested in part-time jobs for students, either for yourself or your children? Here are some great jobs that you can check out.

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The Challenges of Managing Mobile Workspaces for Businesses

Category : Other Stuff

As the internet continues to revolve inevitably the workforce will become far more mobile. We are already witnessing employees craving this flexibility and stepping away from the usual “9-5” momentum. Technology such as Google docs, Cloud hosting and Skype bridge the gap closer together.

The questions employers have to ask themselves “will the modern workplace be in a traditional office or at an employee’s home?” Unfortunately there is no simple answer.
If we take a look at Google’s plans for their new office in London due to be completed in the year 2016, the office space is out of this world. They will hold approximately one million square feet and it will house an indoor football pitch, an open-air swimming pool, a roof garden and a climbing wall. Who would want to work from home when they have all this in their workplace? Google are advertising this as an extension to their company culture.

office

Admittedly we don’t all have the budget to create the workplace of tomorrow, but fear not as there are plenty of humble ways to re-create the workspace of the future. If we think about it we have all seen how technology has changed the way we life but hard assets such as cars and offices have somehow remains stagnant over the years – it is time to change this.

Many companies understand the frustration of remote workers especially when they struggle to get access to adequate space, amenities and networking opportunities. This is why more and more companies are giving their remote employees the option to “hot desk”. Hot desking offers co-working spaces complete with on-site amenities such as meeting rooms, refreshments and printing facilities. It is a proven fact these hot desks inspire and benefit creativity, innovation and collaboration.

The type of worker suited for remote working

The target audience for remote working is someone that is tech savvy and is career focused. This will be more common when Generation Z (individuals aged 13-18) enter the workforce. Did you know that those considered Generation Z spend almost every waking hour on the internet? They are surrounding by social media and eat and breathe the internet.

Due to this mobile working will only grow in the upcoming years. In fact there are plenty of reports to suggest that the mobile workforce will grow to over 1.3 billion by the end of 2015. The reported figure by IDC was just over one billion in 2010.

We take a look at how employers can manage their mobile workspace and consider whether employers are ready for the future:

IS THE STRATEGIC VISION OF THE COMPANY A FLEXIBLE ONE?

As an employer do you have the same mind-set of Google and consider your workplace to be an extension of your corporate ethos and strategy? Ericsson predicts that in the year 2020 there will be over 50 billion devices connected to the world wide web. Employers need to start thinking now how these connected devices will change the way we communicate and work and a company’s vision needs to be ready to welcome these changes. Alternative Networks showcase some of the services to look out for.

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THAT A FLEXIBLE WORKPLACE IS MUCH MORE THAN A PERK?

Employers need to change their mind-set and recognize that flexibility is not a perk but a strategy for success. Companies all over the world have witnessed how flexible working has improved motivation, efficiency levels and profit margins. Employees want to work for a company where they feel trusted and valued.

It is important to note that any change is corporate culture including changes in workspaces will require a set of policies and training guidelines. Any changes need to be communicated well in advance to allow time for employees to understand the changes and to ask any emerging questions they may have.

The ability to utilize flexible workspaces will also be based on the role they have. We have previously mentioned there are plenty of tools such as Google Docs and Cloud to enable employees to work from a remote destination but this would not enable a sales person or someone who has regular contact with clients to carry out their role effectively.

Employers must also consider the social aspects of remote workers. Lone workers as they are commonly referred to can feel isolated at times especially if they have no contact with other colleagues. It is important to get them involved with the company culture as much as possible.

As an employer how do you see your workspace evolving? Is it something you have yet to consider?


Warehouse Jobs

Category : Careers

Warehouses are of very high importance to a variety of entities in the society, especially business owners. They are used to hold goods until they are needed for use. And, of course, workers are needed in these warehouses to ensure things run smoothly. Interested in working in a warehouse? Read on to find out available jobs and some largest employers.

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Online Job Search Websites

There are different ways to finding a job, one of which is through the Internet. Job sites, forums and boards are not in short supply online. However, some of these sites are more reputable and helpful than some others. Here we present some top job sites you can use for your next job search — in no particular order.

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Featured Employer Status on MyFirstPaycheck.com

Get Results!

Become a featured employer at MyFirstPaycheck.com to expose your company to over 60,000 job seekers every month. There are several packages to choose from depending on your business goals and needs. See below for the options and do not be afraid to ask for something special if it is not listed.

Packages

Sponsored Job Resource – $150

Drive customers to your website with a sponsored job resource page. Simply provide the content for editing and approval by the MyFirstPaycheck.com team and make payment. We will schedule it for release based on your requirements.

Directory Listing – $25/annual

The Internet drives customers to your business and with a MyFirstPaycheck.com business directory listing, the power of our link juice will help you drive more users to your website.

Homepage Logo – $85/month

Your logo on the homepage with a link to a MyFirstPaycheck.com page showing your job listings -or- an external careers page. A free business directory listing is included. Spaces are limited, get your order in now!


Jobs For 16 Year Olds

The good news is that at 16, you are just starting your career, and you can get some seriously valuable experience if you know what kind of jobs to take. In fact, if you are the sort of person who has already proven quite talented at something, don’t put that on hold to start working in an office or restaurant. Try to think of a way to make that talent work for yourself in a setting where you get paid for it.

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How to Find a Volunteer Job

Category : Internships

How to Find a Volunteer Job

Volunteering provides a great opportunity for people to show their support for a cause or an organization. It is a great way for job seekers to make good use of their time while hoping for that much-desired career advancement. You do not only get the pleasure of using your time for something good when working as a volunteer, but you also get to have access to several benefits that could ultimately land you that dream job. However, to enjoy these benefits, it is important that you get it right on how you go about finding a volunteer job. The aim here is to prepare you toward making the right choice.

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Advice Survey Results

Advice Survey Results

Welcome to the survey section of myfirstpaycheck.com where you can find advice from experienced members of the workforce or contribute your own.


Justin Guerra’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Selling newspapers

How did you find that first job?
Through an ad in the newspaper

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location, distance from home, and hours of work.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Be polite. Be respectful. Dress nice.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me gain experience and learn what is expected in a workplace

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Have a positive attitude. You might not get hired with the first 5 or even 10 applications, but stay in there. Good things happen to those who wait.


Julie Lynn Hohnecker’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Lawn Mowing

How did you find that first job?
Neighbors and my parents.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Networking with other teenagers and family friends.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
To be honest and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me to be a better person by knowing that I am doing and helping someone else because they are too old to do it themselves.


J. Pelley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bailing and stacking hay

How did you find that first job?
My neighbor asked me to help him when I was done bailing my own hay.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Distance, hours, income

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make a good first impression. Dress well, not grungy.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Discipline and endurance.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t try to go for a job you’ve got no chance of getting.


Anonymous’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
I set out on my street and told all of my neighbors that I was starting a babysitting service and everything took off from there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Ask yourself, do you enjoy doing this job? Do you make enough money? Is it worth it?

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
The first impression means everything, don’t be late.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job has helped me become more responsible.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Think outside the box


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Yard Work

How did you find that first job?
My older brother worked for a man that my dad works with and still does, my brother worked for him for many years and decided to quit because he found a real job and he asked if I would take his place and after thinking about it, I did.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You should be careful on the type of job like if you want to make smoothies for a job than you should make sure that they have a good business report and would be in the right level for you to be working in.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make sure that you are going to be able to answer the questions given without thinking about them for a while, and speak clearly so they know who there hiring.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I found that as I got older you are able to interact with that person easier and are able to get the job done and right to make that person happier, and the more work that you do may be hard but after words it would have really been worth it. As you get older you’ll be able to find better ways to spend and more importantly save the money you have made.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I would definitely try to find a job some where close to home and as you work try to interact with the person you are working with and be positive!


Clorissa’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitting

How did you find that first job?
My mom helped me find jobs.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Don’t give out your information without permission, and if your only a teen, bring an adult with you. Another important thing to remember is body language.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
You should know a lot about the job before you go into it because it might be something you are not capable of.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me some responsibility.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Use good body language and stay in school for any job/career you want. Trust me, school gets you really far in life.


SJ’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Grass

How did you find that first job?
Through family and friends

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make eye contact, stand straight, and smile.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Speak fluently and don’t yell.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me patience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do not whine when you don’t get the job you want.


Alisha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked on an animal farm

How did you find that first job?
I heard about the job from a friend.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure the work is something you are familiar with.

What are some important things to know for the interview, etc.?
Make eye contact.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
This job helped make me more responsible in a lot of ways

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Look for a job that your kind of familiar with


Haley’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Babysitter

How did you find that first job?
My aunt was looking for someone to babysit my four cousins so I decided to help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure you know what the pay and hours are for the job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Having a job prepares me for life

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your best


George S.’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Intern at engineering firm

How did you find that first job?
Pure luck! My mother was working at a bookstore, and the director of this firm purchased the exact stack of books that I had purchased the previous week. My mother commented on the coincidence, the man offered his business card, and the following week, I had an interview.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Have an open mind!

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Remember the motto of the British Special Air Services: PROPER PLANNING PREVENTS PISS POOR PERFORMANCE. Plan ahead, get there early, and know what you’re walking into.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Even though I will never pursue engineering, the skills I learned at the firm have taught me to think visually, spatially, and mathematically.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
HAVE CONFIDENCE! DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS! THERE ARE NO “STUPID QUESTIONS”


Karyn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waitress

How did you find that first job?
I spoke to people at a locally owned little restaurant

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Location (since being on time is really important, and as a teenager I didn’t have my own car when I got my first job) Impressions are really important, dress appropriately, and if you are going to inquire about a job, timing is important…so at a restaurant don’t ask to talk to a manager about a job during a really busy Friday night. When filling out an application make sure you write very carefully (best hand writing and no mistakes).

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Have some knowledge about the company you want to work at, be ready for them to ask you popular questions (like identify a weakness) and be prepared to frame your answers in a way that puts a good spin on it. Also it’s a good idea to think about what question(s) you might want to ask them, because many employers will ask you if you have questions. Punctuality is essential – don’t be late…especially for an interview or your first day. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Learning how to work with people, and in a restaurant serving people, gave me an understanding for the food business that I still find useful today. When the money you make is directly affected by the work of other people (tips aren’t so good when things are going wrong) you learn to pitch in and help wherever you can. I also think it helped me to multitask and have a good memory, I would suggest that everyone works in the food service industry at some point, it’s a good experience.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your homework, look around, and be prepared for it not to be what you expect. People have an average of 7 job changes in their lives, so your first job is most likely not going to be your last. Try to stick it out, and remember that your experiences (good or bad) will follow you when you leave.


Katherine’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Toy Store Clerk

How did you find that first job?
I called the toy store.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t dress messy.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
No, i was fired after 2 weeks

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t dress messy. Be on time.


Sam Blum’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Cold Stone Creamery

How did you find that first job?
I went out and filled out a bunch of applications. Cold Stone called me first, so I took it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Keep an open mind.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Don’t be nervous. If you’ve gotten the interview, or it’s your first day, your employer thinks you can take on the job. Stay confident, be friendly, and most importantly, be yourself.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
My co-workers have become my great friends. It was my first “adult” experience, as I was able to take on new challenges, try new things, and have a great time making money.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Apply everywhere you can, you can always turn someone down. I got my job before my first paycheck, but if I was first looking now, Myfirstpaycheck.com would be a really great place to start.


Nita’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
baby sitting

How did you find that first job?
asked by a friend

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
find people you can trust and display good work ethic themselves

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
relax, dress nice but comfortably, smile, lean forward, shake hands, be pleasant

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
I love kids and liked finding work involving children… I got a good recommendation too.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find work that you like so you look forward to going to work.


Lois’ Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I worked at Pretzel Time in the mall

How did you find that first job?
My friends and I were mall rats. Most of us had jobs at various stores in the mall so we knew the managers and other employees.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
What kind of person do you want to work for? What kind of people do you want to work with?

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Know where you need to go and how to get there, know the dress code, ask questions when you don’t know something.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
The networking I did from that job helped me get jobs for the next four years (even in another city when I went away to college). I still use the networking skills I gained at that job.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be okay starting at the bottom and working your way up…almost everyone has to do it. Have fun with your job and have fun with the people you work with.


Alberto’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Bagger/Cashier- Acme Supermarket

How did you find that first job?
I decided to get a job last summer, and I applied to Acme online. They called me back several weeks later.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Employers love to here from you. If you apply, wait a week, and then call them back “regarding your application”, it let’s them know that you are confident and assertive. Don’t, however, take this to the extreme and call the day after you apply.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Interview etiquette is pretty straight forward. Be polite, but make sure they know they can’t take advantage of you. Make sure you fully understand the job guidelines as well as the salary you are going to receive.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you’re looking for a summer job: -apply early and to many different places, because EVERYBODY is applying at the same time. I recommend starting in March or April. I waited, and I missed about a month of the summer going through the process instead of making money. -Pretty much nobody except beaches and pools wants a worker who will only stay for the summer. They won’t hire you unless you commit for at least through the fall.


Doug’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Fuel Transfer Technician (gas pumper)

How did you find that first job?
I looked on www.myfirstpaycheck.com. Just kidding! That website was just a glimmer in the eye of a bunch of Lavins at that time. The truth is that a kid on my basketball team was quitting and so I took his spot when he left.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Make sure that the job will help you achieve some definite goals, whether they be developing new skills, gaining experience, making money, or whatever. Try to get a job where you are surrounded by a good team of people that will help you and encourage you.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Bring phone numbers for your references. I always forget that one!

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Being a gas pumper at Sunoco? Hmmm. It’s made me want to ride a bicycle everywhere I go. That’s good, right?

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Go for the gusto. Be bold. Be Sincere.


Max’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Waiter

How did you find that first job?
I was walking around and saw a help wanted sign

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
To be open and not to critical

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Be polite, neat, respectful, and try to not to be nervous and freak out

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
My first job I had a boss who was a an incredibly unhappy person who was always riding me and my fellow employees, working there helped me learn to deal with that kind of situation.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Don’t be to critical, never feel trapped, never work for an establishment that treats you terribly dont be afraind to stick up for yourself


AL in DC’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist

How did you find that first job?
The easy way, I got a job at my father’s office when I was 16 year old.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It is important to come to an interview ready to ask questions. Now that I am in a position to hire people, much of my evaluation of candidates’ question about the company and the job.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Before you start ask questions about dress code. Don’t make the mistake of dressing at the lower end of the dress code. Your dress tells your colleagues a great deal about how seriously you take yourself and your job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I was lucky that in my first few jobs I worked for people who felt it was their responsibility to teach me good skills and habits. My first boss told me that I should begin to straighten my desk when the clock struck 5 o’clock and not a moment before. I should actively work and not appear to be waiting to race from the office.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Keeping knocking on doors. Job hunting is depressing and discouraging until the day you get the job. You forget the tough times immediately.


Susan Kilborn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Assistant in the local public library

How did you find that first job?
I was in the library alot and asked if they needed summer help.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Try to think what you like to do most and try to get a job doing that or around other people who are doing it in a support capacity. Persistence is almost always a winner. Keep checking back, dropping by and emailing the place where you really WANT to work. Once you get a job there, ask for help. Ask for feedback. Ask for more responsibility if you see an opportunity for it. Work and SMILE.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
I jumped the gun and answered this one up above.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I still love libraries.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Ask questions. Try to learn something about the place where you work before you get there. such as asking for the roster of personnelle so you can start learning the names of the people who work there. Volunteer for work if you don’t have anything to do. Don’t just sit there!


Emily’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Tennis instructor

How did you find that first job?
through my tennis coach

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
make sure you do something you love

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
dress professionally, arrive early

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It taught me discipline

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Do your research!


Steve in Seattle’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Window Washer

How did you find that first job?
I teamed up with a buddy and we brought squeegee’s and soap and a bucket to an outdoor strip mall and told each store that we were real experienced, and finally an art store hired us on a regular basis. I think we got a couple more stores, and after a couple weeks we actually got pretty good at window washing.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
If you depend on walking or bicycling, or the bus or mom & dad to drive you, consider the convenience of the place you are selecting. Pay attention to the workers already there who you might have to work with. You might ask them, without letting the boss hear you, how long they have worked there, and do they like it. If you sense that three or four people have recently left, and that everyone there is somewhat new, then the “turn over” is high, and the boss might be a grouch, or expect more work out of you than what the job desciption says.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Well, I am no longer a teen. But I was a teen once. I would suggest making a great first impression on the one in charge of hiring you. Give them eye contact and a firm handshake, and try not to look down like you are shy or frightened, even if you are. If they ask your name, say it clearly as though you are proud of your name. And yes, dress a bit fancier than what will be expected if hired. You can always roll up your sleeves when they get comfortable with you, but if you start out dressed too casual, it is hard to become more formal at that point. The hardest part of an interview in your situation might be if your future boss decides to engage you in small talk, such as, “How about those Eagles?” or…”What music do you listen to?” It can get tricky, but just be aware in advance that you might have to say something about sports or music or a certain movie or TV show. I would advise you to pretend to first take interest in what team or TV show your future boss likes, then agree with their taste, or say, “My parents like the same thing you do.” It is less about what you answer, than how. Grown-ups just want to feel like their teen employees will be able to carry on an intelligent conversation, and not steal from them. If the interviewer says anything that seems the slightest bit inappropiate or too personal, remember not everything is their business, and it would be best to politely excuse yourself and look for work elsewhere.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?Regardless of your age, the bottom line is you are costing your boss money if you get hired. They have something you want, or need, and it pays to smile and be respectful to them.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
If you are handed a job application, offer three or more “character” references, as you will not yet have any job references. The best character references come from local business owners, politicians, priests, rabbis, and ministers, who are well established. Perhaps you are regular customers at a local grocery store, car repair place, or nursery, and have gone in with your mother or father, or friend. Or a dentist, or alderman is your neighbor, and you go to school with their kids. You can ask them permission to put their name and business/occupation and number down on your job application. It really “beefs it up,” and, again, gives the impression you are honest, not spacy, and won’t take drugs…the stuff older folks who own businesses have concerns about when they think “teen.”


Ari S’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Narberth Cheese Company as a sales associate.

How did you find that first job?
All I did was walk around town and look for “Help Wanted” signs. When you see them, I went into the store and asked for an application.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Location: It has to be easy and cheap for you to get to.
  2. Your Commitment: You have to know how much time you are able to work and be honest about it.
  3. Your Capability: Can you see yourself working at the place you are applying? Meaning is it over your head or not, and are you able to stand doing it You don’t have to like it, but that would be a plus. Also, when you go to ask for an application it would be great if you did not look like a slob. First impressions are key.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Once again, don’t look like a slob when you go to the interview. If you feel like it, dress up a little…it never hurts. And for the first day (and maybe even first month) don’t get hung up on little things that you mess up. You’re new, you’ll be corrected, and then you move on.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?The Cheese Company has been a great experience for me. In fact, I’m still there (I’ve only been there for a year though). I do everything from sales, to inventory, to janitor…ing. I have met a lot of people and learned about many things, not all of which are about cheese.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

  1. If you are applying for the summer, don’t wait until the end of school.
  2. Most places will require working papers, so get those from your school’s main office or guidance office.
  3. Be practical about where you are going to work
  4. Not to sound too lame, but try to have a little fun with it…if that’s at all possible.

Mark’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
I taught swimming to kids at the local YMCA.

How did you find that first job?
The assistant coach to my high school swim team worked there.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

  1. Find a job that you can get to without relying on someone else.
  2. It’s your first job, not a career. So, although it’s always best to do something interesting, don’t sweat it if it’s not.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Interview:

  1. Be serious, but also yourself at the interview. They’re usually more interested in whether you’ll fit in than whether you know how to do the job, especially when we’re talking first job-type stuff like cashier, line cook, etc.
  2. Dress to impress. You should be dressed about one notch fancier than what you would actually wear to the job.

First day:

  1. Show up early. It shows you’re responsible and gives you time to get the lay of the land.
  2. Dress to impress. Just like #2 above. It shows you’re serious. You can dress down on your second or third day.

Employment:

Remember, the reason it’s called work and it’s something you’re paid to do is because it’s not always fun. Even rock stars hate their jobs some days.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?

Teaching is actually something I’ve done on and off ever since my first job. So I guess that I lucked out and found something that I really enjoy doing.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?

Pound the pavement and don’t be disappointed if you get turned down the first few times.


Ari’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at Thrift Drug as a cashier
How did you find that first job?
I walked around looking for summer jobs until I found it.

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
As a teen? Get as much money as you can because anything you do will be fairly dull.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Make sure you are clean and well dressed, always be enthusiastic about everything

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
Back then I learned how to deal with customers and today, I still deal with them, only now, I call them clients.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
At this young age, follow the money.


Ronn’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
McDonald’s Cashier

How did you find that first job?
I walked in and asked them if they hired 14-year-olds (Nowhere else did)

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
Are you going to be able to be cheerful at the job? How badly do you need the money? Could you get something better? Remember, this isn’t a career.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Try to seem independent, despite being dependent on your parents. Just act intelligent. A place like McDonalds doesn’t care about your skills or anything.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
I know I never want to work as a cashier. I value money in terms of hours of McDonalds work now.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Your best bet as someone with no experience is to get a job through a relative.


Josh’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Soccer Referee

How did you find that first job?
A friend of mine was doing it, and I asked him how I could get involved

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
You’ve got to be realistic about logistics, including how many hours you can work (and want to work). It’s nice to make money, but you if you spend all of your time in school and then at work, you’re going to miss out on a lot of enjoyment. Remember, the older you get, the more you end up working and you have less time for yourself.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
Take everything seriously. Employers look for maturity and a sense of responsibility.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
As a referee you take a lot of criticism, no matter how good you are. It was important for me to learn how to take criticism (even though it may not be constructive). I also learned to stay confident in the face of criticism.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Find something you like to do or are interested in and see if there is any way to get paid while being involved in it. For me, I loved playing soccer, so I looked for ways to get paid while being around the game. If you get into the habit of working for money, you will always just be working for money. But if you get into the habit of getting paid for doing what you like to do, you will end up much happier.


Austin’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Mowing Lawns and Shoveling Snow

How did you find that first job?
Went to neighbors who I knew, talked to my parents friends, friend’s parents, anywhere where I could walk

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?

It’s important to find something that you enjoy because it’ll make working easier. I liked being outside and having control of my own hours so landscaping was never hard.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?

Show them that you want the job, and be capable of your own abilities. Most kids have worked in some capacity; babysitting, petsitting, yardwork, etc. remember that you are capable of handling the responsibility, and than make sure you do a good job.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It helped me get the next job and the job after. I was able to take on a big landscaping project for a neighbor and a friend that involved multiple days and hiring my brothers, but I knew I could do the job, and I could it cheaper than a professional landscaper. I was also able to use that experience to obtain my first salaried position, at a plant nursery.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
Be persistent. If you aren’t getting rejected, you’re not trying hard enough.


Nick’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Receptionist at a Law Firm

How did you find that first job?
A friend of the family worked there

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to remember how the expenses of getting to the job, etc, are going to effect the amount of $ you take home – for example, one place may pay more than another, but it’s so far away that the expenses of the commute kind of even the salaries out.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
If you act like you don’t want to be there, you’re not going to be there for long.

How has that job helped you as you grow older?
It’s helped me realize that I never want another job that requires me to answer phones with the same line, all day long.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for his or her first job?
You’re probably not going to get a job that you actually like – welcome to the world of work.


Bracha’s Advice

What was your first job as a teenager?
Working at the Mall of America for Gapkids (and spending all of the money I made at gap–great discount!)

How did you earn that first job?
I knew a friend that had started there so i was able to get an interview

What are some important things to remember when looking for/selecting a job?
It’s important to know how you’ll get there and back every shift, if you will be able to work the number of hours you want, if you will be able to make “enough” money, how the boss is, how the staff is, the perks, etc.

What are some important things to know for the interview, first day, and for being employed in general (possibly for the first time)?
It’s important to present yourself well, which usually means dressing up a little bit, not chewing gum, cell phone off. It’s important to maintain open communication so if you have a question about the first day, or any day, that you ask your supervisor. Better to ask than to try to figure it out yourself

How has that job helped you as you grew older?
It helped me get my second job, which helped me get my third job, etc. also, I think that at some point everyone should work in the service industry (retail, restaurants, theme parks) because even though people can get rude, if you can handle the crowd you can handle any assignment further down the line.

What piece of advice would you offer somebody today looking for their first job?
Use any connections from friends or family members that you might have (or websites that cater to first time employees!), don’t get discouraged if not everyone is hiring, or they do not hire you. Find the places that are hiring, drop off applications, ask when you should expect a call, and follow up by that time by calling to talk to the manager.



Image: Flickr


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Job Resources for Teens

Category : My First Job

Finding a job can be hard, but knowing the laws behind working can be even harder. Myfirstpaycheck.com is here to help.

While every state has slightly similar regulations, the following are some links from the federal department of labor that provide a good overview.

Check them out for more information, and remember you don’t have to stay in a job that makes you feel uncomfortable or work for a boss that makes you feel uneasy.

The following laws are meant to protect you. Make sure you know your rights.

  • Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA): General overview and help Navigating DOL Laws and Regulations
  • Youth in the Workplace: More specific information regarding child labor regulations and helpful shortcuts.
  • YouthRules! This department of Labor’s initiative seeks to promote positive and safe work experiences for young workers.

More specific subtopics for further investigation:



Image: Flickr


Jobs For 15 Year Olds

Category : Careers , Jobs For

The focus is on where you can get hired, and there are a lot of places that you can find work at 15. If a job is not considered a physical hazard, 15-year-olds are eligible to work it. This means you can become a model, be a movie extra, get started in a restaurant, find yourself working in a number of different retail spaces and even find yourself working in an office. Note that there are restrictions on the hours you can work when you are 15 established by the US Department of Labor. Take this into account and get started on your job search.

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Jobs For 14 Year Olds

Tags :

Category : Careers , Jobs For

When you’re looking for a job as a teenager, options can be a little bit limited until you are 16 when you can work full time. However, there are a lot more jobs for 14-year-olds than there are for 13-year-olds, and aside from the usual like having a paper route, babysitting, or doing odd jobs for extra cash, a number of different businesses can actually hire to you work, too.

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Jobs For 13 Year Olds

Tags :

Category : Jobs For , My First Job

While younger teens might not be able to legally take on part-time work in larger establishments, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t more than enough jobs for 13 year olds out there for those that go beyond babysitting. After all, a little bit of creativity can pay off big when it comes to your bank account! And there’s never been a better time to start brainstorming about what sort of part-time work you can manage, what companies you can work for, and how you will land that job.

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Where to Find Jobs Locally

Category : Job Search

As a teenager, searching for a job can be difficult. Most job searches will provide results for degree holders, but not for teenagers who are looking to earn some extra cash from an after school or a summer job. Fortunately, there are a few places that you can look to find a good job around your town.

  1. Bulletin Boards: Bulletin boards can be found in a variety of places around town and are ideal for finding information on various things, including job possibilities. You will most likely see bulletin boards in grocery stores, post offices, cafes, and news shops, which means the postings will be very local. People will use these to post things for sale, services offered, classes, lost or missing things or animals, and jobs. A job post should provide a brief description of the job type, responsibilities, and location. There should definitely be contact information so that you can inquire and even apply for the position. Some postings will have tear offs at the bottom of the page with the contact information so you can take it with you.
  2. Community Centers: Community Centers are a great resource for your job search. There are usually a lot of job opportunities there because they have connections with a variety of groups and organizations throughout town. If you like active, hands on, and creative jobs, this is a good place to work as community centers run a lot of sports and games activities, day camps, and various classes such as art.
  3. Newspapers: Although the internet is taking over most things in our life, the newspaper is still used. In the classifieds section of your newspaper you will find job postings for opportunities in your area. You will be provided with contact information so that you can inquire with the employer.
  4. Word of mouth: One of the best ways to find a job is by networking. Let people know you are looking for a local job, whether you prefer babysitting, waiting tables, or an office job. The more people you talk to, the higher the chances are that someone will know of a job opportunity for you. Networking is also beneficial because through your connections you may be able to meet with the employer directly, rather than with their secretary or another employee.

 



With all of these options, you will have a variety of jobs to apply to in order to earn some extra money during the school year or during your summer vacation!