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High Job Expectations

Category : Other Stuff

Sandy Banks wrote a column in the LATimes about her daughter’s job search. Her daughter is having a hard time finding a job, but Sandy thinks that one of the reasons is that her daughters expectations are too high.

But she also writes, “But two weeks of pounding the pavement — or at least occasionally scrolling through “help wanted” ads on Craigslist — have produced not a single employment offer for my 17-year-old daughter . . . the one with the expensive tastes and empty wallet.”

As (hopefully) any myfirstpaycheck.com reader would tell you – thats not how youre going to find a job!

You have to

1. Be Brave. Even in this economy, there are plenty of employers out there looking for the affordable, enthusiastic, and energetic help that teenagers provide, but you have to go out and ask for it. Dont be afraid to apply for jobs.

2. Be Polite. You are applying for a job; dress up, make eye contact, shake hands, and avoid using slang. First impressions matter – make sure you are remembered for your application and not your attitude.

3. Be Prepared. Bring a resume and a cover letter whenever you apply for a job. Having a good resume is essential. It shows that you are serious about the position, and that you are mature and responsible. If you need help writing a resume, myfirstpaycheck.com provides a dynamic free resume for teens
that is very helpful.

4. Be Persistent. It would be nice if you were immediately offered every job that you ever applied for, unfortunately this is not the case for anybody. Persistence pays off; send a thank you note to interviewers, follow-up i? you do not hear about the job after a week, and keep applying.

5. Be Creative. Look for work in places other than the mall. The weakening economy means that people are going to be looking to cut costs in areas such as lawn and child care. Get a few friends together and start a landscaping or a babysitting business. Working for yourself is a great way to earn money and develop skills that will help you find your next job.

But Sandy also has a good tip for parents. She writes, “Employers hate it when Mom does the work to get the job, It’s the kiss of death if Mom walks into Starbucks dragging the kid by the hand.”

What should parents do? “Make sure youre clear that there are plenty of opportunities out there, but that getting a job takes persistence.” Tell them, “You keep going back, even if they dont call you. You let them know you really want to work.””